ice cream

Lemon Ice Cream

 

The combination of lemon and cream is one of my favorite things in the world. And lemon is such a generic fruit, it sounds like it should be a common flavor for ice cream but I don't remember ever seeing it in stores or at ice cream shops. There's nothing sour about this ice cream, just the perfect amount of tanginess and a hint of zest for a sophisticated finish. If you want another lemon dessert recipe, check out my lemon marshmallows.

 

Lemon Ice Cream

2 cups heavy cream

6 egg yolks, whisked

1 cup whole milk

1/4 cup lemon juice (juice of about 2 lemons)

2/3 cup sugar

zest of 3 medium sized lemons

 

Zest the lemons with a microplane zester, being careful to only get the yellow parts. This is really important, or else you will get the rinds and will turn your ice cream very bitter. Cut and juice them once you're done.

In a food processor, pulse the sugar with the lemon zest until it is thoroughly mixed and the sugar becomes yellow. 

Combine the sugar, cream, and whole milk into a double boiler. Fill the bottom with water and heat on medium heat, just until the sugar dissolves. You don't want to get this mixture too hot or else you might have egg drop soup instead of custard. Pour a little bit of this mixture into a bowl with the egg yolks while whisking. Once everything is mixed, pour a little more of the cream mixture and repeat until you use up about a third of the cream mixture. Pour the cream + yolk mixture back into the double boiler. Turn the heat on again (medium heat) and constantly mix with a wooden spoon. Once the custard starts to form, you can feel the spoon get heavy as you mix. At this point, check the consistency by running a finger down the back of the spoon. If the custard doesn't run and the line you made sticks, you're done.

Remove the pan from the heat and let cool 30 minutes. Add the lemon juice and mix once the waiting time has passed. Strain and pour into a container, cover, and chill in the fridge overnight. 

After the custard has chilled, churn the custard in your ice cream machine and let harden in the freezer for a couple hours.

 

 

Basil Ice Cream

 

This basil ice cream was born from an inspiring night at Uchiko, our favorite restaurant in Austin. They take fine dining to the next level with fresh fish from the Tsukiji market and the most amazing sushi rice. I grew up eating lots of sushi, and I had always thought a tekka maki was the most boring thing. The fish is lean and there's not much flavor (I opt for the more potent stuff, like mackarel and bonito). The one at Uchiko however, I could eat all day... and what it ultimately comes down to is how well the sushi rice is prepared. If you're ever in the area definitely visit this place, you won't regret it. 

One of the nights we were there we ordered the seasonal dessert, a basil granita layered on top of honey crumble and jasmine cream. The last time we had a basil dessert was in Munich, a basil sorbet, and I was taken aback by how refreshing it was. This time around we really enjoyed the combination of herbal and rich, and the next day we experimented with it to make ice cream. And guess what. It was amazing.

 

Basil Ice cream

2 oz fresh sweet basil

2 cups heavy cream

1 cup whole milk

1/8 tea spoon kosher salt

6 egg yolks

1/2 cup sugar

 

Pulse the basil in a food processor and set aside. Whisk the egg yolks in a bowl and set aside.  Combine the heavy cream, whole milk, salt, and sugar in a double boiler and heat until the sugar dissolves completely and then turn off the heat. Slowly add the cream mixture into the yolk while whisking until a third of the mixture is used. Pour the yolk + cream mixture into the left over cream mixture while whisking. Turn the heat back on to medium-low heat and stir constantly with a wooden spoon. When you feel the mixture thicken, draw a line through the mixture on the back of the spoon, and take off from heat when the mixture doesn't run. Set aside to cool to room temperature, and add the basil before putting it into the fridge to cool overnight. When it's time to churn, strain the basil and make sure to really press on the basil leaves at the end making sure to get all of the juices out. Churn with an ice cream machine.

 

 

Amaretto Ice Cream

 

We thought of this amaretto ice cream recipe when Anthony and I were trying out a restaurant in town called L'Oca d'Oro. It's interesting how we approach the experience of dining at a restaurant in a completely different perspective now after a year of recipe developing and experimentation. Now it's more about finding inspiration and looking for ways to encourage ourselves to get out of our comfort zone in terms of combining odd ingredients. One dish that stuck out to us was the creamy panna cotta with shaved fennel and pine nuts. The fennel added no flavor but instead a refreshing texture and the pine nuts added some heartiness and it was perfect. And while we watched these dishes unfold, we came up with the idea of adding amaretto to our favorite ice cream base.

 

Amaretto Ice Cream

2 cups heavy cream

1 cup whole milk

1/8 tea spoon kosher salt

6 egg yolks

1/2 cup sugar

3 tablespoons amaretto

 

Whisk the egg yolks in a bowl and set aside.  Combine the heavy cream, whole milk, salt, and sugar in a double boiler and heat until the sugar dissolves completely and then turn off the heat. Slowly add the cream mixture into the yolk while whisking until a third of the mixture is used. Pour the yolk + cream mixture into the left over cream mixture while whisking. Turn the heat back on to medium-low heat and stir constantly with a wooden spoon. When you feel the mixture thicken, draw a line through the mixture on the back of the spoon, and take off from heat when the mixture doesn't run. Strain the mixture and set aside to cool to room temperature before putting it into the fridge to cool overnight. When it's time to start churning, add three tablespoons of amaretto. Churn with an ice cream machine.